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The Secret Library Podcast

The truth about writing books. By speaking to authors and other book lovers, I'm diving into the mystery that is the book world today. From writing to editing to publishing and all that goes into the creation of a book – all of it is open for discussion on the show.
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Now displaying: April, 2017
Apr 27, 2017

Madelyn Kent has found a surprising way into creativity.

For many of us who write, we spend a lot of time up in our heads. We might even pend most of our time in our heads. Since writers are making up worlds, it does make sense that our daydreams would come from our minds and that, as artists who create with words, thinking would be our happy place. But when we get stuck, staying in the mind can be a trap. 

I was delighted to have a different sort of conversation this week with Madelyn, who has taught playwriting, screenwriting, and theater at NYU the past 15 years. In 2008, she trained in the Feldenkrais method and, through that work, began to see parallels between movement and the creative process. Since this discovery, she has developed Sense Writing, a mthod that combines writing with movement sequences and often opens up creative awareness and flow. 

I love it when I keep coming back to a subject, like writing and creating books, and keep discovering new worlds and approaches to creativity and expression. I hope this episode reminds us all that not only are we not brains in jars, we are better writers for it. Building a connection with the body can open up all kinds of possibility in your writing. I can't wait for you to listen to this episode and see why. 

Full show notes with links | This episode sponsored by Scrivener

Apr 27, 2017

Madelyn Kent has found a surprising way into creativity.

For many of us who write, we spend a lot of time up in our heads. We might even pend most of our time in our heads. Since writers are making up worlds, it does make sense that our daydreams would come from our minds and that, as artists who create with words, thinking would be our happy place. But when we get stuck, staying in the mind can be a trap. 

I was delighted to have a different sort of conversation this week with Madelyn, who has taught playwriting, screenwriting, and theater at NYU the past 15 years. In 2008, she trained in the Feldenkrais method and, through that work, began to see parallels between movement and the creative process. Since this discovery, she has developed Sense Writing, a mthod that combines writing with movement sequences and often opens up creative awareness and flow. 

I love it when I keep coming back to a subject, like writing and creating books, and keep discovering new worlds and approaches to creativity and expression. I hope this episode reminds us all that not only are we not brains in jars, we are better writers for it. Building a connection with the body can open up all kinds of possibility in your writing. I can't wait for you to listen to this episode and see why. 

Full show notes with links | This episode sponsored by Scrivener

Apr 20, 2017

Cory Doctorow not only writes about the future, he's also advocating for a better one in reality.

As I get more familiar with the world of Science Fiction, it strikes me that most writers in this area are also secretly activists of some form or another. Cory Doctorow, author of numerous books, including the forthcoming Walkaway, is also the co-editor of BoingBoing and a technology activist. He is a special consultant to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (eff.org), a non-profit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards and treaties. He holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a Visiting Professor; he is also a MIT Media Lab Research Affiliate. In 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

What this means for this episode? I was eager to talk about Cory's latest book, which feels incredibly relevant in the wacky times we are living in throughout the world, but I was also eager to talk about technology as a whole and the impact he sees our crazy times having on publishing and on writing books in general. One of the beautiful things about Science Fiction is that it tends to present a possible future. We are able to think deeply about how we would like our future to look when reading about one potential outcome. If we want that future to be different, we can look at the course the world is taking right now and respond differently. I was inspired to ask these kind of questions while reading Walkaway, and as I spoke to Cory. I hope you will be similarly inspired.

Full show notes with links | This episode sponsored by Scrivener

Apr 13, 2017

Guinevere de la Mare is a renaissance woman, with books.

I met Guinevere because I stumbled upon a meeting of the Silent Book Club at the XO conference last September in Portland. I was delighted to see a whole group of people quietly reading together, out in public. Finally, the perfect social outing for introverts! 

Upon connecting with Guinevere to learn more about this reading haven, I was fascinated to hear about her career at Chronicle Books prior to creating the SBC. Even better- she has a book coming out this August and was excited to talk about that. So... if you're into discussing the perils of calling yourself a writer, the early days of online media for publishers, how to start your own chapter of the Silent Book Club so you, too can read peacefully out in the world, this is going to be a very happy episode for you.

Full show notes with links | This episode sponsored by Scrivener

Apr 6, 2017

After winning a contract with the publisher of her dreams, Katie Dalebout sat down to write her first book.

She submitted the proposal in the 11th hour before the deadline and won, an amazing story that makes up the introduction of her book, Let it Out: A Journey Into Journaling. Instead of re-telling that story, we discussed the nitty gritty details of sitting down and writing and editing the book after she had gotten the proposal approved and received her book advance. Listen up to learn how Katie created her writing schedule, why having an advance motivated her, her decision to use part of her advance to hire a copyeditor, and the experience of doing the re-writes. 

I love this conversation because we get into the process of writing, what it feels like to sit down and do it in the midst of a busy life. Katie is quite self-aware and talks opening about writing this book in her early twenties and how now, in her late twenties, she already sees that she's quite a different person who hopes to write very different books in the future. If you're looking for tips to structure your writing sessions and context on how to get the book done along with the rest of your life, this episode will serve you well.

Show notes with links | This episode sponsored by Scrivener

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